School of Health Professions

BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy

Do you want to help people to live the lives they want and need to live? Do you want to help people deal with life challenges including ill-health, disability, and social problems? Do you want to learn how everyday activities can be used and adapted creatively to promote health, wellbeing and a satisfying lifestyle? As an occupational therapy student, you’ll do this and much more.

UCAS tariff
320
UCAS course code
B920
Institution code
P60
Duration
3 years
(with placements)
Start date
September 2014
Course type
Full-time
Location
Peninsula Allied Health Centre, Plymouth

Key features

  • Experience problem based learning designed to be practical and close to real life issues faced by Occupational Therapists.
  • Benefit from accreditation by the College of Occupational Therapists
  • Experience practice placements which demonstrate a range of core skills required for professional practice

Course details

  • Year 1
  • You’ll initially share teaching and learning with students from other health professions allowing you to gain core generic knowledge and skills. Gain practice skills through an 8 week supervised placement within the South West. We’ll introduce theoretical foundations and core skills which will underpin practice. Your first placement will be within a health, social or community setting. Develop problem solving, reasoning skills and an embedded commitment to lifelong learning.
    Core modules
    • OCT113 Functional Anatomy and Physiology for Occupation

      A knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human body is an important foundation for Occupational Therapists. This module is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology relevant to professional practice.

    • OCT114 Occupational Studies: Foundations for Occupational Therapy Practice 1

      This module introduces philosophical and theoretical foundations of occupational therapy, introducing the student to concepts of the person, environment, occupation and performance. Core skills underpinning the professional practice of occupational therapy will be introduced.

    • OCT115 Occupational Studies: Foundations for Occupational Therapy Practice 2

      Students will identify the intrinsic components of occupational engagement through exploring the range of components required to engage in occupational performance. Students will study the interaction between person, occupation and context to explore how occupational therapy theory and process promotes occupational engagement.

    • OCT116 Occupational Studies: Humans as Occupational Beings across the Life Span

      This module will examine occupational science and occupational therapy perspectives of occupation across the life span including transitions. The dynamic relationship between engagement in occupation, health and well-being for individuals, groups and communities will be explored.

    • OCT117 Practice Placement 1

      This module enables students to experience occupational therapy within wider contexts of inter-professional or multi-agency practice. Students will experience collaborative working with colleagues from other disciplines. Through supervised practice, students will develop basic skills underpinning occupational therapy, relating this to campus based study.

    • SOHP101 Preparation for Practice

      This inter-professional module will introduce you to professional practice and the inherent standards expected of you. The characteristics and identity of allied health professionals, as evidence based practitioners, will underpin learning ‘with’ and ‘from’ one another. Working together you will develop your understanding of professional standards for conduct and ethics, and knowledge of the key principles to support practice grounded in evidence. You will explore communication and interpersonal skills to support shared decision making, and learn the skills of reflective practice. As a student you will actively engage in debate, discussion, small group presentations, self- guided study and other group-led activities.

    • OCT118 Psycho-social Concepts for Occupation

      This module addresses themes in health and social care from a psychosocial perspective relevant to occupational therapists and understanding occupation. Students are introduced to behavioural science issues including psychology and sociology to consider contexts influencing understanding of occupation.

  • Year 2
  • Profession-specific modules take a lifespan approach and are designed to provide an integrated core of essential knowledge and skills for OT practice. Modules on inter-professional working and research help you become confident in your role as a developing OT. Take part in the OT intervention process during your placement.
    Core modules
    • OCT212 Occupational Studies: Occupational Challenges Across the Life Cycle

      Using PBL, students will analyse the occupational challenges faced by individuals, groups and communities with multi-faceted complex needs across the life span. Students will critically evaluate interruption and its impact on occupational performance, identifying and recommending ways of sustaining engagement.

    • OCT213 Occupational Studies: Occupational Presence

      This module explores the engagement with and application of volunteering as an occupation linked to a relevant organisation or group. It leads to discussion of the meaning and purpose of volunteering and potential for this in understanding service provision, occupation and occupational science in an organisational or group setting.

    • OCT211 Occupational Studies: Occupational Therapy Toolbox

      Students will apply the core skills of occupational therapy and occupational science to individuals, groups and communities. Assessing and applying appropriate occupational therapy skills and practice tools including the therapeutic use of self to sustain occupational engagement.

    • OCT214 Practice Placement 2

      The module builds on occupational therapy knowledge, skills and experience gained. Students will actively participate in the occupational therapy intervention process, demonstrating increased autonomy whilst being supervised. Knowledge and skills underpinning inter professional working will be further developed.

    • SOHP201 Project Studies 1

      This module enables the student to develop a sound understanding of research terminology, methods, and principles. It develops knowledge and skills related to evidence-based practice and lifelong learning. The content is designed to enable the students to understand different research designs, to evaluate the research literature and to prepare them to undertake research at undergraduate level.

  • Final year
  • You’ll gain greater independence in your final placement and, with support, be able to demonstrate a range of core skills required for an entry level practitioner. Profession-specific modules prepare you for the responsibilities facing newly qualified graduates. Inter-professional modules help you develop and consolidate management and research skills and lead you towards your imminent entry into the occupational therapy profession
    Core modules
    • HEAA312 Management and Leadership for Inter-professional Practice

      This module builds on level 2 work to enable students to apply and evaluate models of management & inter-professional working within healthcare.

    • OCT309 Occupational Studies: Exploration into Practice

      This module provides the opportunity to explore, select and evaluate a specialist area of occupational therapy to examine in greater depth than elsewhere in the curriculum. Specialist areas chosen will reflect current trends and developments in practice for occupational therapists across a broad range of settings.

    • OCT310 Occupational Studies: Occupation for Promoting Health & Wellness of Communities

      This module evaluates the importance of applying health and wellness principles to contemporary occupational therapy practice. It critiques and syntheses current and emerging theory and research on the impact of occupation to promote health and wellness of communities.

    • OCT312 Practice Placement 3

      This module will require the student to demonstrate a range of core skills that will be required of a competent entry level practitioner. The student will develop increasing autonomy, working at times independently demonstrating professional reasoning skills and decision making relevant to clients needs and contexts of practice.

    • OCT307 Professional Studies Level III

      This module will provide insight into the roles and responsibilities facing newly qualified graduates. It aims to prepare students for the job market and entering the profession. It explores the challenges facing newly qualified clinicians and builds on existing skills, knowledge and understanding developed during practice placements.

    • HEAA313 Research 2

      Students will undertake and complete a short piece of research developed from the level II protocol involving the collection and interpretation of a small amount of data. Findings will be presented in the format of a selected professional journal article and conference presentation.

The modules shown for this course or programme are those being studied by current students, or expected new modules. Modules are subject to change depending on year of entry.

Entry requirements

GCSE’S
5 GCSE’s grade C or above to include Mathematics, English and Science. Preference is given to applicants who have obtained these grades on application.

PLUS ONE OF THE FOLLOWING:

UCAS tariff
320 points – 100 points must be in Biology, Science or Social Science.

IB
27 points (with a minimum of 13 at Higher Level).

Access 
60 credits overall with 45 at level 3, of which 30 must be at distinction level, including 15 in a Science/s.  A further 15 points must be at merit level. Must have GCSE grade C or above in English & Maths or be taking them. 

BTEC
Diploma DDM – Must be Health or Social Science profile. 

Extended Science: 65% at 1st attempt. Must apply direct to Plymouth University by 15 January.

Equivalent qualifications may be considered, please contact admissions@plymouth.ac.uk.

Extended entry requirements

  • In addition to the above, evidence of academic study within the last five years is required.
  • How to select the right Access course.
  • Please note we do not accept Key Skills Level 2 in place of GCSE English or mathematics.
  • You must pass disclosure and barring service and occupational health checks satisfactorily in order to be able to start this course.
  • If English is not your first language and you do not have GCSE English grade C or above you will have to achieve an IELTS or equivalent qualification at the grades stated below.
  • IELTS - Overall average score of at least 7.0, with a score of at least 7.0 in the listening and reading sections and at least 7.0 in the writing and speaking sections.
  • TOEFL 'internet-based' test (ibt) - 100.
  • TOEFL Paper test - 600.
  • Meeting the academic minimum is the first stage of an application being considered. Applicants must also submit a strong personal statement in order to be considered further.


Further information

Fees & funding

Home/EU £9,000 International £11,500
You’re entitled to a means tested bursary (the amount depends on your current financial circumstances) for the duration of your course through the NHS Business Services Authority if you’re a UK national.  The NHS will meet your Tuition Fee Contribution on your behalf if you’re a UK or EU national.   This information is not relevant to those who are seconded. To receive funding you must meet the eligibility criteria set out by the NHS Business Services Authority.

How to apply

All applications for undergraduate courses are made through UCAS (Universities and Colleges Admissions Service). 

UCAS will ask for the information contained in the box at the top of this course page including the UCAS course code and the institution code. 

Apply for this course on the UCAS website.

For more information about submitting an application including application deadline dates, please visit the UCAS website.

As from 2014-15 academic year, all NHS funded professional courses are required to select and interview their applicants using a ‘values based’ approach. As part of this process, your UCAS personal statement will now also require this additional information, which will demonstrate insight into your understanding of the importance of NHS values in your chosen professional discipline.

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Information required by UCAS

Institution code
P60
UCAS code
B920
Campus code
There is no campus code
Application deadline
See UCAS website for deadline dates
Apply now
http://www.ucas.com/apply

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A number of open day events are held each year, welcoming you to the campus to find out more about the University, accommodation, facilities and study opportunities.

Find out more from our open days section or register to come and see us using a short open day registration form.

Student Insight - Alison Emony

Occupational Therapy appealed to me because it has such a positive and practical approach to enabling people to make the most of their lives.

Alison explains more